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Take responsibility for your own future at work

To keep your job in today’s work environment, will take more than just showing up on time every morning – you must make yourself indispensible!

Nobody is immune against the effects of the international economic crisis. People lose their jobs on a daily basis, while those who are still lucky enough to be employed have to go full out to keep on receiving that salary check at the end of every month.

Why should hard working citizens tolerate this?

The trade union UASA demands that government take urgent and immediate steps against officials abusing the system. Enough taxpayers’ money has been wasted on these cases.

UASA ready and willing to work with

For the first time Pres. Jacob Zuma’s State of the Nation Address created the impression that government is eager to put South Africa to work. His address made us feel positive and motivated; we look forward of being part of the plans he spelled out.

With nationalisation off the table, mines are once more free to invest in massive projects

UASA welcomes the statement by Deputy Mineral Resources Minister Godfrey Oliphant that nationalisation is neither government nor ANC policy.

DMR reviews guidelines for issuing

UASA has emphasised several times in the past, as it did again in March last year,  that although Section 54 of the Mine Health and Safety Act has no doubt saved many lives, the current indiscriminate application thereof should be reviewed because of the damage to the economy. 

Currently, all the activities at a mine are halted when an incident occurs, even if it only affects one specific plant or a workplace. According to Franz Stehring, UASA’s Divisional Manager responsible for the mining workers' sector, calculations show that each day of zero production mean losses of approximately R6 million per day which directly affect profits. Quantifying the potential loss to the three main mining houses over the period of one year means that the mining industry loses approximately a whopping R3,24 billion per annum. 

Petrol price: Battered consumers can stand no more

Ripple effect on consumer goods expected

Combination of low interest rates and high inflation benefits the over-indebted

Now is the time to tackle debt and not to give in to the temptation of luxury living

Rocketing prices of petrol, meat, oils and fats put consumers under pressure in 2011

South Africans, with the exception of the high income group, are experiencing very high inflation. 

Workers and pensioners spending less than R79 152 per year on consumer goods and services should have received an increase in income of between 7.3% and 8.3% just to maintain their purchasing power. Those who received less were worse off in December 2011 compared to 2010. 

Education crisis should get government’s full attention in 2012

The milestone celebrations of the ANC as an organisation needs to be applauded. 

Although the 8 January speech by President Zuma proved to be somewhat disappointing, we are heartened by the fact that so much emphasis has been placed on the country’s education crisis. Our education and training system should indeed be the cornerstone of all efforts to radically transform South Africa and build a truly non-racial, non-sexist, democratic, united and prosperous society. 

UASA had hoped that Zuma would make some strong and clear points in respect of other serious issues concerning South African workers, including job creation, economic reform, the European debt crisis, and the future of the mining industry in terms of the Nationalisation debate.

LOWER PETROL PRICE BRINGS MUCH NEEDED RELIEF FOR WORKERS AND PARENTS

The drop in the fuel price at midnight tonight, as announced by the Department of Minerals and Energy, will bring some much needed relief to workers and parents of school going children alike.

Paying 6c less for 93 Octane, 5c less for 95 Octane and a whopping 20c for diesel will have an positive effect on disposable incomes now that the expensive Festive Season is behind us. 

Parents of school going children have the extra expense of school gear and rising school fees to reckon with, whereas others are recovering from the usual Christmas and holiday spending. 

Unfortunately, as the decrease in the fuel price will be short lived due to rising oil prices, the possibility of a ripple effect on production prices will be limited.

Message from the CEO

Dear Colleagues and Friends

2011 is on its last legs and soon fireworks and champagne will herald the birth of a new year.  It is time to take a break from your daily business and rest body and mind for the challenges of 2012.

UASA is immensely grateful for the successes achieved by the union during the past year.  Without the dedication, commitment and hard work of our staff, it wouldn’t have been possible.  Our loyal members and full-time representatives played an equally important role in our strength and influential position.  For this I thank you all most sincerely.

I wish the entire UASA staff and membership quality time with your loved ones during this festive season.  May you return to work in the new year with zeal and zest, refreshed and invigorated to tackle the challenges of 2012 with your characteristic diligence and commitment.

Sincerely

Koos Bezuidenhout

 

Needed: School leavers who are independent, creative thinkers with realistic expectations

With approximately 512 000 full time and 108 000 part time learners that wrote the matric exams last year, there is excitement and an expectancy in the air by and on behalf of the those who wrote the exams. The Minister of education will supposedly be equally excited to learn if she has been able to push up the pass rate to 70%, more than the 68% of 2011.

Unfortunately it seems to have become a bit of a fool’s game.

FEDUSA calls for extra public holiday

Tuesday 27 December 2011 declared a public holiday in SA